CONDUCTIVE HEARING LOSS

Otosclersosis

ossiclar reconstruction

TYMPANOPLASTY

CHOLESTEATOMA

COCHLEAR IMPLANT

MASTOIDECTOMY

MASTIOD CAVITY/EAR
CANAL RECONSTRUCTION

There are two types of hearing loss. A conductive hearing loss exists when sound can not be transmitted through the middle ear. This type of hearing loss can be due to a number of causes. Infections, scarring of the eardrum, otosclerosis (scarring of the bones of the middle ear), and trauma to the middle ear bones are just a few of the possibilities. The important point about a conductive hearing loss is that in many cases it can be corrected without the need for a hearing aid.

The most common cause of conductive hearing loss is a middle ear infection. After an ear infection, fluid may become trapped behind the eardrum. This fluid will prevent the eardrum from moving properly. This will decrease the transmission of sound through the ear. While this situation will frequently resolve without any treatment, placement of ear tubes (pressure equalization tubes) will usually correct the problem if it persists. You can read more about ear tubes in the Pediatric section of this website.

Other common causes of a conductive hearing loss include otosclerosis, damage to the ossicular chain (bones of the middle ear), a hole in the eardrum (tympanic membrane perforation), and a cholesteatoma. Otosclerosis can corrected with stapes surgery. Ossicular chain damage can be corrected using ossicular chain reconstruction procedures. A tympanic membrane perforation is corrected using a tympanoplasty. A cholesteatoma is a cystic lesion which often is removed using a mastoidectomy procedure.

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