CONDUCTIVE HEARING LOSS

Otosclersosis

ossiclar reconstruction

TYMPANOPLASTY

CHOLESTEATOMA

COCHLEAR IMPLANT

MASTOIDECTOMY

MASTIOD CAVITY/EAR
CANAL RECONSTRUCTION

This is a surgical procedure used for the removal of a cholesteatoma and the treatment of chronic otomastoiditis.

The mastoid bone sits directly behind the ear. It is connected to the middle ear space through a series of air pockets and channels within the bone. A mastoidectomy involves removal of these air pockets. It is usually done to remove a cholesteatoma or for chronic otomastoiditis.

The most common symptoms that may lead you to require surgery of this nature include chronic ear infections, chronic ear drainage (otorrhea), hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), or dizziness. In the past, a mastoidectomy resulted in an ear canal being turned into a large mastoid cavity which required frequent cleaning every three to six months for years to come. Procedures were developed to eliminate the cavity, leaving the patient with a normal ear canal, however they resulted in a much higher rate of cholesteatoma recurrence.

Dr. Gianfranco Toso has developed a technique that allows for the complete removal of a cholesteatoma with an extremely low recurrence rate. The surgeons rebuild the ear canal immediately after the cholesteatoma is removed, eliminating the mastoid cavity characteristic of older forms of surgery. An attempt is made to restore hearing in almost all cases. This provides for a safe ear while maximizing hearing potential.

back to homepage